Clubs, Reading, Writing

Classic women – classic books

Classic book group

I belong to a book group – no, not a book club. We are a group . We came together based on our love of reading which became evident around the release of the Harry Potter books. Such shared joy led to a regular coming together to rave about Harry and other brilliant publications. We usually meet over breakfast and then disperse in our various directions – work, home, baby-sitting, workouts etc.

I have to confess that I entered this group under slightly fraudulent circumstances – I hadn’t actually read the HP series. Oh, I started the first book several times, but along with Tim Winton’s Cloudstreet, I never really got past the first 100 pages! But once I was in, and showed off my clever insights into other literary works, the other members let me stay.

Our group has survived almost ten years, and I can’t recall how many books we’ve read. Admittedly, our attention has occasionally been diverted away from actually discussing books. Oh come on, I’m sure that’s representative of many book groups. Mind you, there’s a book group in Tacoma, called the  Classics Book Club who are absolute show-offs – they can list every book they’ve read per month since 1994!

FaceBook reading/writing ideas

There is a plethora of reading/writing sites in FaceBook – just do a search. I belong to a few. For example, one FB group, called Have Your Book Reviewed , is a platform for  new authors to make their works available for a short period for free in return for members reading them and then posting their reviews. Also in the Gold Coast, we have Book Appreciation and Recommendation group, Let’s Talk Writing,  and Inspiring Authors and Motivating Speakers (https://www.facebook.com/groups/1731586593754653),  Bookworms Bookclub, and GC Wrimos (https://www.facebook.com/groups/gcnanowrimo). Of course I should include https://www.facebook.com/BeverleyStreaterReaderWriterCriticalFriend/?pnref=lhc

Classic reads

Anyway, in preparing my next Classic Women blog post, I started researching books written by, and about, classic women – what a Pandora’s box! Not sure if I should cheer at my findings or apologise for putting pressure on you!

I came across and instantly loved this article, which starts, “The one struggle of being a woman who reads is that you want to read everything.”  Here is the Huff Post’s recommendations of 21 books women should read

Then, I found a piece by Arianna Rebolini who offers a selection of 102 (!) books that were written by women.

Back to the Huff and I read about 11 classic novels featuring women who rebelled against their times and conditions.

I also discovered an article about a feminist bookstore in Chicago that promotes writers who are women and/or socially marginalised. Women & Children First began in a modest storefront in 1979, which strives “to offer a place where everyone can find  books reflecting their lives and interests in an atmosphere in which they are respected, valued, and well-served.”

My findings

I have to admit, the list of books I should read before I die, as directed by my search in Mr Google, is extremely long and somewhat overwhelming. When I browse through the recommendations of classics, I can confidently say I’ve read a few of them – usually because they were “set” texts at school or uni.

I will continue to draw on the wise recommendations of my book group buddies – we haven’t had too many disastrous reads (except for my choice of classic, Moby Dick – oh no, what a difficult read!) We’ve had some ripper reads –  older (classic) books as well as modern books that will deserve to join the esteemed field of classics in future years.

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4 thoughts on “Classic women – classic books

  1. Thanks, Classic Women, for providing a rich list of reads! This may be my go-to when looking for my next book.
    The list from Classics Bookclub took me back many years. I read Of Human Bondage in my youth and it continues to haunt me. Might have been my first trigger to study psychology. Time to return to it and see if life experiences have equiped me to understand the characters from a new perspective.
    Great post, CW!

  2. Interesting article Bev. I have searched FB looking for a book club to join. It must be great to read a book and then get together to discuss it, as I am sure every readers imagination would have a different slant on the characters and plot. Happy reading, sounds like you have a big bucket list of books.

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